We are often in the Media. We are grateful to the media for playing an important role in sharing our successes but most importantly for outlining the wider implications of road trauma and the benefits of road safety in our community.

FEATURED IN

     

MEDIA COVERAGE

OFFICIAL MEDIA RELEASES

2020

25 November 2020

MEDIA RELEASE

ROAD ACCIDENT REMEMBRANCE DAY 2020

The Road Traffic Accident Trauma Charitable Trust trading as National Road Trauma Centre (‘Trust’) will host its fourth Road Accident Remembrance Day at 10-30am on Saturday 28 November 2020 at the Lake Front, North Hagley Park, Christchurch.

The Road Accident Remembrance Day is a public event that brings together the local community to acknowledge those who have been affected by road traffic related accidents. Attendees include members of the emergency services, those involved in post-accident care and accident recovery personnel.

It will be an opportunity to acknowledge road crash survivors many who may have had life changing experiences and to acknowledge 34 victims that tragically lost their lives on the roads in the Christchurch and Canterbury Region from 1 September 2019 – 31 August 2020.

In conjunction with the Road Accident Remembrance Day the Trust will also announce the seven deserving recipients of its fourth annual Canterbury Road Trauma Awards. The four Award categories are Canterbury Road Trauma Awards for Public Service, Community Service, and Trauma Prevention and Lifetime Achievement. Each community nominated recipient will be presented their Award by the Canterbury Road Trauma Awards Committee.

The event key partners include New Zealand Police, Fire and Emergency New Zealand, St John, Canterbury West Coast Air Rescue Trust, Canterbury District Health Board, New Zealand Transport Agency and Canterbury Charity Hospital Trust.

Acting Inspector Greg Cottam said “Canterbury Police are pleased to support the National Road Trauma Centre during Road Accident Remembrance Day.

He said each life lost on our roads is a tragedy. Families and friends are faced with a huge gap in their lives through the devastating loss of their loved one.

 Remembering those lost during the year is very important to family and friends, and raising awareness of those affected by crash long term is the hidden part of the trauma caused by crash.

This includes the survivors, emergency service workers, members of the public who assist at crashes, medical staff, counsellors and others who deal with the aftermath of crash.

A Remembrance Day is an opportunity to honor those who have left us and to remind us all of the need to use our roads safely to prevent further tragedy.”

Jim Harland, Director Regional Relationships, Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency, says Waka Kotahi never underestimates the ongoing and much wider human cost of every road crash on families, friends and a person’s network of connections, as well as the effects on the front-line responders.

“No crash resulting in death or serious injury is acceptable, so it’s important we take every opportunity to address the risk,” he says. That might be through speed reviews, through creating more forgiving roadsides, through encouraging people to check the safety Star rating of a vehicle before they buy it, through speaking out if people are driving too fast and you are a passenger.

“Through New Zealand’s Road Safety Strategy, Road to Zero 2020 – 2030 (http://transport.govt.nz/area-of-interest/safety/road-to-zero/) and a programme of work delivering safety improvements, including speed management, on our highest risk intersections and roads across New Zealand, education and advertising campaigns Waka Kotahi aims to reduce the number of people killed or seriously injured on our roads.”

Sarah Dean, Founder of the Trust says “The annual Road Accident Remembrance Day is of course a public event, and a day for affected families, friends and colleagues to take pause to remember and reflect. We encourage everyone to attend to show their respect to the survivors, as well as remember those that have tragically lost their lives in road related accidents.

It is also a day in which we give thanks and acknowledge the emergency service personnel and health care professionals involved in post-accident care and recovery.  We will also announce the recipients of the 2020 Canterbury Road Trauma Awards and it will be our pleasure to congratulate and honor their outstanding achievements on the day.”

Representatives from New Zealand Police, Fire and Emergency New Zealand, St John, Canterbury West Coast Air Rescue Trust, Canterbury District Health Board, New Zealand Transport Agency and Canterbury Charity Hospital Trust including Award recipients will be available to speak to the media at the ceremony at a formal media station approximately 15 minutes at the conclusion of the ceremony.

For further information or comments please contact Sarah Dean on 027 324 0918 or roadtraffictrauma@xtra.co.nz.

END

23 November 2020

MEDIA RELEASE

EMBARGOED 12PM, SATURDAY, 28 NOVEMBER 2020

2020 CANTERBURY ROAD TRAUMA AWARDS RECIPIENTS

Now in its fourth year, the Road Traffic Accident Trauma Charitable Trust (‘Trust’) is hosting the annual Road Accident Remembrance Day on Saturday, 28 November 2020 at 10-30am on the Lake Front, North Hagley Park, Christchurch.

In conjunction with this, the Trust will also announce the recipients of the 2020 Canterbury Road Trauma Awards. Each community nominated recipient will be presented their Award by the Canterbury Road Trauma Awards Committee.

Sarah Dean, Founder of the Trust says, “These Awards have received tremendous support since its inception and it is a great honour, as Founder, to able to recognise and honour outstanding individuals who echo the Awards philosophy at this years forth Road Accident Remembrance Day”.

Emeritus Professor Alan Nicholson, Chair of the Canterbury Road Trauma Awards Committee says, “This year it is our pleasure to announce the deserving Award recipients who have demonstrated a duty of care, commitment and courage to the prevention of road crashes and the mitigation of the trauma caused by road crashes.”

COMMUNITY SERVICE AWARD RECIPIENTS

Joseph Bradley and Kelly Phillips

On 5 November 2019 a single vehicle crash occurred at the intersection of Lehmans Road and River Road, Fernside, North Canterbury. The net result of the crash was the tragic death of a six-year-old child Lachlan Gebhardt who died as a result of the crash.

Shortly after the crash at approximately 4.15pm Joseph Bradley has been a passer-by and pulled over after seeing smoke and dust as a result of the crash and also being flagged down by persons who had already stopped. The crashed vehicle has been down a stop bank over River Road and has landed against a tree on its side.

When Bradley has arrived, he has observed the vehicle and noticed that flames are coming from the engine area and the smoke is filling the interior. Bradley has then thought quickly and realised he would need something to cut seatbelts and returned towards his vehicle where he has been met by another passer-by Kelly Phillips who has also stopped.

Bradley has instructed Phillips to obtain something that could cut a seatbelt and returned to the burning vehicle. Phillips and Bradley have then dragged Gebhardt further to safety away from the burning vehicle.

On Bradley’s return to the crashed vehicle he has noticed Niklas Gebhardt in the front passenger seat area and although observing that this person’s back was on fire, he has pulled open the passenger side front door and pulled this burning male from the vehicle and placed him on the ground a few metres away. They have ensured Gebhardt is no longer alight and provided some reassurance.

“They have, particularly Bradley, risked their own safety in order to save the life of another. At a minimum they have reduced the severity of Mr Gebhardt’s injuries, which included severe burns to his body,” says Detective Sergeant Andrew Owens, Rangiora Police Station, Canterbury Police.

“I am very grateful to be receiving this Award. To be recognised publicly for what we did is hugely uplifting. I would like to thank Kelly, who without hesitation put his life on the line to come with me and perform the rescue. He is a brave soul because he put himself in the forefront of a situation that everyone else was running away from.

We were simply armed with nothing more than hope and courage. Without Kelly coming into the fire with me, I am not sure I could have gone in and extracted Gebhardt alone.

On reflection, I can say with confidence that if I was met with this situation again in the future, I would have no hesitation in doing the same,” says Joe Bradley.

“This Award has come as a complete surprise and feel so humbled to receive it. I was so fortunate to have Joe there.

We were one of the first on the scene, of a horrendous accident, but we did the best we could in a very bad situation. I am sure many people would do the same thing. But that day was our turn to help others,” says Kelly Phillips.

Rakaia Volunteer Fire Brigade

The Rakaia Volunteer Fire Brigade have attended to numerous near fatal accidents. The majority of these crashes have been on State Highway One between Dunsandel and Dromore where the nearest ambulance is approximately twenty minutes away.

Two of significance including on 21 June 2020 at 4.39am the Rakaia Volunteer Fire Brigade attended a multiple injury, near fatal crash on Bridge Street in the Rakaia Township where they were able to locate all (eight) of the occupants from a motor vehicle some of whom had been ejected from the vehicle. They provided medical attention for a range of injuries, two of which were life threatening, prior to ambulance staff arriving at the scene.

“The immediate actions of the Rakaia Volunteer Fire Brigade at this event significantly made an influential difference to each victim and it is no doubt through their swift and immediate actions of providing first aid at the road crash site saved their lives, says Senior Constable Aaron Tapp, Serious Crash Unit, Canterbury Police who nominated the Brigade.

On 18 November 2016 at 5.22am the Rakaia Volunteer Fire Brigade attended a serious crash on the Rakaia Highway in Rakaia where the driver of a car suffered a traumatic amputation of his left arm. The Rakaia Volunteer Fire Brigade was able to stabilise the male prior to the arrival of the Canterbury West Coast Air Rescue Trust. On this occasion medical personnel on the helicopter commented that their actions saved his life.

In 2016 they voluntarily sought sponsorship and fundraising activities to obtain a purpose built 2017 ISUZU D-MAX LX 4WD, Medial Ute first response vehicle which is above and beyond their duties which has enhanced their capability to enable them to attend off road trauma incidents without committing their front line rescue tender. This has enabled the Rakaia Volunteer Fire Brigade to attend vehicle crashes and medical call outs simultaneously if required.

“While we certainly do not volunteer for the accolades, we are amazed and flattered to receive this Award. We are passionate about Rakaia and are always here to answer the call whenever our pagers go off. I am immensely proud of our Crew and the work that they do, and I know our local community are as well,“ says Tyrone Burrowes, Chief Fire Office, Rakaia Volunteer Fire Brigade.

PUBLIC SERVICE AWARD RECIPIENT

Andrew Hall

Andrew Hall is National Programme Manager for the New Zealand Spinal Trust, managing both the Trust’s Peer and Whānau Support team and Vocational Rehabilitation service.

Andrew has been associated with New Zealand Spinal Trust for almost 20 of the 26 years that he Trust has been in existence, including CEO, Board member and Board Chair. Andrew has always had a focus on helping those living with a spinal cord injury get back into a positive, fulfilling, rewarding life – regardless of any long-term limitations.

Andrew has his own lived experience of tetraplegia following an accident in 1983 that resulted in a broken neck. Andrew has seen and supported many motor vehicle accident patients who have come through the Burwood Spinal Unit, especially at moments when one might consider their situation to be a fate worse than death.

“I am very humbled and honoured to receive this award but wishes to stress that it is the entire team of incredibly committed staff and volunteers at the New Zealand Spinal Trust that makes a real impact for people who have sustained a spinal cord impairment.

This is the team which every day shows people that despite what’s happened they can be living independent, confident and productive lives, right now,” says Andrew Hall.

ROAD TRAUMA PREVENTION AWARD

Helen Bickers

Helen Bickers is an Intensive Care Paramedic (ICP) working for St John Ambulance in Christchurch. Helen has been with St John since 1994, becoming an ICP in 2011 and has worked through the Christchurch earthquakes and mosque shootings.

After attending crash after crash and seeing the devasting affects and aftermath, Helen thought about what could be done to change people’s ways and help them be safer on the roads.

Helen now dedicates her spare time speaking to people from all walks of life, whether it is talking about ‘a day in the life of a Paramedic’ or motivating audiences to change their behaviors on the road through her experiences and the impact it has on her and her colleagues.

Helen works closely with the NZ Police on their Impaired Driving Education Programme (IDEP) for recidivist drunk drivers. The Police support this nomination, advising Helen is like a mum and aunty to many of the participants, and her passion, integrity and style of delivery adds considerable value to the programme.

Odyssey House strongly value her work on the Driving Change programme and programmes for recovering alcoholics, drug addicts, those that have been released from prison who are trying to reintegrate into the community. Helen listens to their stories, their goals and achievements, then shares herself and her story to show we are all the same.

Her approach to her audiences is emotional and impactful as she candidly explains the impact that impaired driving has on her personally. She says her payback is seeing people react to her and change their ways.

Helen speaks at prisons, women’s groups, Probus and many other community groups – in Helen’s words ”I will talk to anyone or any group that will listen if it will make a change for the better.”

 Sarah Barham

Sarah Barham is the Clinical Manager at the Laura Fergusson Brain Injury Trust. The Trust provides 24-hour residential support for people who have suffered traumatic brain injury.

Sarah has been employed at Laura Fergusson in 2007 and was recruited to implement change in a positive manner, ensure the clinical safety for the people we support and design care that was centered on patients unique and increasingly complex needs.

Over the past eight years, Sarah has grown her Registered Nursing team and fiercely advocates on behalf of our clients. Sarah demonstrates her long-term dedication and credibility in her trusted relationships with clients, families and whanau.

Sarah genuinely cares about each patient; she knows every client holistically including their pre -injury background, family situation, health and social needs and understands what it takes to enable ordinary life opportunities.

“Sarah exemplifies the core values of our organisation in the way she cares about the people we support. She respects clients their families and whanau and strives to ensure that the environment and the clinical support they receive is of the highest quality, says Kathryn Jones, Chief Executive Officer, Laura Fergusson Brain Injury Trust.

LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

John Isitt

John Isitt has recently retired from his role as Sergeant, Serious Crash Unit at Canterbury Police and has been in traffic enforcement for over 33 years. In that time he attended in excess of 240 fatal motor vehicle crashes and a large number of serious and minor injury crashes. In the late 1980s John joined the Ministry of Transport and after approximately 5 years became a Police Officer in 1992, where he continued in specialise in traffic enforcement. In 2003 he joined the Serious Crash Unit and assisted in setting up their procedures, practices and reporting systems.

During his career John was committed to improving the attendance and reporting of crashes and instigated a number of ideas and improvements that have resulted in better liaison with local body roading authorities and New Zealand Transport Agency. This has seen a steady and continual improvement in the safety of our roads such as realigning corners, better marking at intersections or placement of safety barriers.

John also invested a significant amount of training and mentoring to Police colleagues in crash investigation along with new constables when they first arrive in the District and has been an instructor for crash investigation courses for more experienced Constables.

The Serious Crash Unit attends crash scenes at the time of the crash and in all weathers to ensure that the best evidence is gathered at the scene to ensure the most accurate reports can be furnished to the courts.

You are welcome to obtain further statements prior to the Road Accident Remembrance Day. Award recipients are not be published until 12pm on Saturday, 28 November 2020 after the Road Accident Remembrance Day ceremony.

As this involves trauma for some Award recipients we ask that you please respect their privacy and direct any enquiries for further statements as indicated below:

For further information on the Canterbury Road Trauma Awards, please contact Sarah Dean on 027 324 0918 or roadtraffictrauma@xtra.co.nz.

BACKGROUND

“In 2019, car occupants, motorcyclists, pedal cyclists and pedestrians involved in road crashes accounted for 51% of major trauma in New Zealand. Hence, road crashes contribute substantially to the load on NZ’s health system. The number of road crash deaths in 2019 was 352, which is 39% greater than the number of road crash deaths in 2013, when there were 253 road crash deaths.

The increase since 2013 can be compared with the period from 1987 to 2013, when the number of road crash deaths decreased from 795 to 253 (a decrease of 68%). The approach used to achieve that decrease involved focusing on identifying road locations where crashes were occurring and treating those locations using relatively inexpensive methods. A return to that approach is very likely to result in a major decrease in both road crash trauma and the load such trauma imposes on our health system,” says Emeritus Professor Alan Nicholson.

END

TRUST LAUNCHES PROPOSAL FOR NATIONAL ROAD TRAUMA CENTRE

Today the Road Traffic Accident Trauma Charitable Trust launched plans for a National Road Trauma Centre based in Christchurch.

The concept was launched to key health agencies, road safety organisations, and emergency services who have endorsed establishment of the Centre.

The announcement is the culmination of 10 years of work by the Trust to improve health outcomes for those impacted by road crashes.

“The National Road Trauma Centre will allow the Trust to deliver road safety initiatives, research, health promotion, education, clinical care and innovative technology to reduce road crashes and help close the gap on health disparities for people affected by road trauma,” Trust Chair Sarah Dean says.

At the launch, the Trust was seeking sponsorship and community support to establish a National Road Trauma Centre in close proximity to the city’s Justice and Health Precincts.

Intensive Care Specialist Dr David Bowie, who spoke at the launch, said, “The Centre will be the first of its kind in the world. I have seen a lot of trauma in my career, and from my perspective, any initiatives that prevent road crashes are so vitally important. I see the direct consequences of road crashes on the survivors and their whānau and there is a need to provide long term support.”

“The Centre is a unique opportunity that focuses on educating the general public and patient centric care. It will also encourage greater industry collaboration amongst health care and transport industry professionals to reduce the number of deaths and serious injuries from road crashes.”

“The Centre is a great initiative,” road crash survivor Scott Bamford said. “There is very little support for people affected by road crashes, in particular, those in rural and remote communities where there is greater impact.”

The Trust announced an indicative cost of $2.2 million for fit out and design of the Centre. It is aiming to source this through public and private sponsorship. Other associated costs, including commercial land lease or land purchase, will also need to be taken into account. The Trust is planning to start crowdfunding in early 2021.

Dean said the Trust is expecting it to take 12 to 18 months for the Centre to get underway.

“We have had tremendous support over the past 10 years and have worked alongside many caring and compassionate industry professionals who have shared our vision,” she said.

“We all recognise that a specialist Centre needs to be established to meet the complex needs of people affected by road crashes, enhance collaboration amongst industry professionals and agencies, and reduce the economic cost of road trauma in our communities.”

For further information please contact Sarah Dean on 027 324 0918 or visit roadtraffictrauma@xtra.co.nz or visit

BACKGROUND

Motor vehicle crash injuries have the highest rate of major trauma (physical injuries) in New Zealand. Road traffic related crashes are a significant major cause of psychological distress, including post-traumatic stress disorder.

Speakers at the launch include:

Sarah Dean, Chair, Road Traffic Accident Trauma Charitable Trust

Dr David Bowie, Intensive Care Specialist

Stuart Cooper, Intensive Care Paramedic

2019

4 November 2019

MEDIA RELEASE

 ROAD ACCIDENT REMEMBRANCE DAY

CANTERBURY ROAD TRAUMA AWARDS CEREMONY

The Road Traffic Accident Trauma Charitable Trust (‘Trust’) will host the Canterbury Road Trauma Awards ceremony on Saturday, 9 November 2019 at 1.30pm, Media Room, Justice and Emergency Services Precinct, Christchurch.

Since 2017 the Canterbury Road Trauma Awards has celebrated and recognised the honorable achievements and contributions of eminent Canterbrians through the highly regarded Canterbury Road Trauma Awards.

“This year the Awards will honor an exceptional group of highly-respected Canterbrians some of whom have made an exemplary example not only on a local but national level. These deserving Award recipients inspire us through their achievements and challenge us to make our own contribution to provide an influential difference to the lives of those impacted by road trauma; particularly in trying or challenging circumstances or by producing safer roads through minimising deaths or serious injuries”. Sarah Dean, Founder.

The Canterbury Road Trauma Awards is a program of the Road Traffic Accident Trauma Charitable Trust. Award categories include Canterbury Road Trauma Award for Public Service, Canterbury Road Trauma Award for Community Service, and Canterbury Road Trauma Prevention Award. Each community nominated recipient will be presented their Award by the Canterbury Road Trauma Awards Committee and Martin Small, President of the Australasian College of Road Safety.

Canterbury Road Trauma Award Committee Chairman, Emeritus Professor Alan Nicholson of the University of Canterbury said  “Many deserving individuals and organisations make an enormous contribution to road traffic trauma reduction in our region and it is important to recognise their efforts, whilst at the same time encouraging more Canterbury businesses to increase their efforts to reduce road traffic trauma.”

The Canterbury Road Trauma Awards ceremony is a public ceremony to acknowledge the meritius efforts of those in our community who made an exemplary example those that have been affected by road traffic related accidents.

Attendees will include members of the emergency services, those involved in post-accident care and accident recovery and distinguished guests.

Speakers for the ceremony include:

Professor Alan Nicholson, Chairman, Canterbury Road Trauma Awards

Martin Small, President, Australasian College of Road Safety (Adelaide, Australia)

Inspector Ashley Tabb, Head of Roading, Canterbury Police

Jim Harland, New Zealand Transport Agency, Director Regional Relationships

Professor Gary Hooper, Head of Department, Orthopaedic Surgery and Musculo Skeletal Medicine, University of Otago, (Christchurch).

Mike Johns, Deputy Area Commander, Fire and Emergency New Zealand

Sarah Dean, Founder, Road Traffic Accident Trauma Charitable Trust

This ceremony will replace the fourth annual Road Accident Remembrance Day which was due to take place on Saturday, 9 November 2019. Regrettably due to unforeseen health circumstances of the Event Organiser. The annual Road Accident Remembrance Day will continue to resume in 2020.

The ceremony will also show respect to the survivors and those that have tragically lost their lives in road related accidents. It will also acknowledge emergency services personnel and those involved in post-accident care and recovery.

Media Schedule:

1.00pm – 1.30pm : Opportunity to interview each deserving Award recipients.

1.30pm – 2.30pm : Canterbury Road Trauma Awards ceremony.

A formal Media Release announcing the deserving Canterbury Road Trauma Award recipients will be distributed on Wednesday, 6 November 2019, however public announcement of the Award recipients names would be embargoed for Saturday, 9 November 2019 at 2.30pm.

For media passes or further information, please contact Sarah Dean on 027 324 0918 or roadtraffictrauma@xtra.co.nz.

END

25 July 2019 

MEDIA RELEASE

2019 Canterbury Road Trauma Awards Nominations and Awards Nationalisation Announcement

Nominations for the Canterbury Road Trauma Awards open on Monday, 29 July 2019.

In 2017, the Road Traffic Accident Trauma Charitable Trust introduced the annual Canterbury Road Trauma Awards, to honour industry professionals and members of the public who have worked to minimise road crash trauma, both directly at road crash sites and in an ongoing manner.

Outstanding individuals, teams or professional organisations making a special contribution to road safety, public education, road trauma prevention initiatives, and displaying a professional duty of care in Canterbury, are invited to put forward a nomination for the Awards to celebrate their contribution to the reduction of road trauma.

Canterbury Road Trauma Award Committee Chairman, Emeritus Professor Alan Nicholson of the University of Canterbury said nominations for the third annual Canterbury Road Trauma Awards will open on 29 July.

“I urge those in the post trauma care and road safety sectors to consider entering this years’ awards, not just to share their stories of success but to inspire others to make an influential contribution to the reduction of road trauma in our community.”

“Many deserving individuals and organisations make an enormous contribution to road traffic trauma reduction in our region and it is important to recognise their efforts, whilst at the same time encouraging more Canterbury businesses to increase their efforts to reduce road traffic trauma”, says Prof.  Nicholson.

“We also encourage those that have aided or assisted at road crash sites that do not quality for the New Zealand Bravery Awards to put forward a nomination, as those that are first at the scene of a road crash site often make a significant difference to the outcome of patient post trauma care and deserve to be recognised”, says Prof. Nicholson.

“It is with great privilege the Trust is announcing that in alignment with our ten year anniversary in 2020 we will nationalise the Awards. We believe the reach and need for acknowledgement is far greater than just those directly involved within the Canterbury community”, says, Sarah Dean, Founder.

“We will work with the sector to ensure the National Awards adequately meet the needs of the industry. We intend to include a consultation process to ensure we also target key stakeholder and Government priority areas”, says Sarah Dean.

This year, there are three Award categories, Canterbury Road Trauma Prevention Award, Canterbury Road Trauma Award for Community Service and Canterbury Road Trauma Award for Public Service.

The third annual Canterbury Road Trauma Awards will be co-presented by industry representatives, including Martin Small, President of the Australasian College of Road Safety.

For further information on how to enter the third annual Canterbury Road Trauma Awards, please visit: www.roadtraffiaccidenttrust.org.nz. Nominations for this year’s Canterbury Road Trauma Awards close on 30 September 2019 and the winners will receive their awards at the Road Traffic Accident Trauma Charitable Trust’s Road Accident Remembrance Day on Saturday, 9 November 2019 at 2.00pm, in North Hagley Park, Christchurch.

The Canterbury Road Trauma Awards Committee members who decide the award recipients are Emeritus Professor Alan Nicholson (Civil and Natural Resources Engineering, University of Canterbury);Jenny Dickinson (Lead Advisor Strategic Interventions, Safety and Environment, New Zealand Transport Agency). Councillor Aaron Keown (Christchurch City Council and Canterbury District Health Board); Prof. Gary Hooper (Head of the Orthopaedic Surgery and Musculoskeletal Medicine Department, University of Otago Christchurch); Dr Glen Koorey (Principal, Senior Traffic Engineer and Transport Planner, ViaStrada); Steve Wakefield (Steve Wakefield Services Limited and Canterbury District Health Board) and Sarah Dean (Road Traffic Accident Trauma Charitable Trust).

ENDS

1 May 2019

Kia Kaha concert offers unique opportunity

This weekend’s Kia Kaha concert has provided a unique opportunity for a local charity to gain exposure through concert organisers One Love Australia.

The Road Traffic Accident Trauma Charitable Trust (RTATCT) Founder Sarah Dean will speak at the concert and officially launch its Local Legends Ambassadors at the concert on Saturday 4 May 2019 at the Aurora Centre.

One Love Australia is running the concert and is an organisation that aims to facilitate and foster harmonious communities in Australia and abroad. We believe in grassroots movements that take a bottom-up approach to seek change in negative attitudes towards minorities and the disadvantaged.

One Love Australia Chief Impact Officer & Founder Ahmed Gamal Elshiekh, a Sudanese migrant to Australia, said the concert was an important opportunity for the community to come together across Australia and New Zealand so that we can start building a better future.

“This concert presents a strong opportunity to bring the Christchurch community together at a time when it’s needed most. Being able to partner and feature local charitable organisations like the RTATCT is very much something at the core what One Love Australia is trying to achieve.”

RTATCT currently hosts an annual Road Accident Remembrance Day to remember the people who tragically lost their lives on Canterbury roads and has also introduced the Canterbury Road Trauma Awards.

“The Canterbury Road Trauma Awards are for ordinary people doing exceptional work, day in, day out, across Canterbury and recognise those in the community who may otherwise not be acknowledged,” said Sarah Dean, Founder of the RTATCT.

“My main philosophy is to make an influential difference to others by creating powerful platforms to allow them to engage and talk about difficult and often not talked about impacts of road trauma. This year the Trust has developed the concept of Local Legends, who are ambassadors to promote and endorse these distinguished Awards.

I am hugely passionate about giving back to others and continuously look at ways of presenting leadership opportunities.  Local Legends is just another platform to help establish aspiring or promote established leaders in our community”. said Sarah Dean, Founder of the RTATCT.

RTATCT was established by Sarah Dean in 2010 to provide an unmet need for those in our community deeply impacted by road trauma. The Trust provides free counselling, community education and in 2019 is launching ‘Road Trauma in our Community’ road shows. The names of the Local Legends Ambassadors will be officially launched in June.

The introduction of Local Legends Ambassadors is to help spread the word and promote the awards. One of these ambassadors, Anton Matthews has been appointed by the Trust to speak during the concert. Anton is a social entrepreneur and business owner of Fush and Joe’s Garage (Wigram). Fush has a unique aspect in that they support and embrace the normalisation of te reo Māori. In 2018 free te reo lessons were first established at Fush but what followed was a large movement of people in Christchurch wanting to learn te reo Maori. Anton and his whānau are currently touring the South Island with their Fush food truck and teaching more free te reo lessons to communities around Te Waipounamu.

Performers at the Kia Kaha Concert include Reece Mastin, Taylor Henderson, Alfie Arcuri, Louise Adams and the Cobham School Choir with Ali Harper.

Tickets for Kia Kaha are still available at https://premier.ticketek.co.nz/Shows/Show.aspx?sh=KIAKAHA19

ENDS

2018

30 October 2018

BANKS AVENUE SCHOOL HEARTFELT MESSAGE TO EMERGENCY SERVICES

The Road Traffic Accident Trauma Charitable Trust (‘Trust’) is hosting the annual Road Accident Remembrance Day on Saturday, 3rd November 2018 at 10-30am on the Lake Front, North Hagley Park, Christchurch.

On Monday, 29 October 2018, 400 pupils at Banks Avenue School filled their library to share some very heartfelt messages to the emergency services and those involved in post-accident care and recovery. In attendance were Fire and Emergency New Zealand, Fire Fighters from ANZAC Station.

Sarah Dean, Founder of the Trust says, “Children often have very heartfelt messages and this is an opportunity for the students to share it with the emergency services in their own special way”.

As one of the Team Miro students, Tessa Stewart said, “To you this man is a hero, but to me he is my dad and he’s a superhero”. Tessa’s dad, Michael is a member of the Banks Avenue School Board of Trustees and is a Fire Fighter for Fire and Emergency New Zealand.

“Our school values are based on the HEART values, ‘H’ is for Hauora which is ‘holistic wellbeing’, ‘E’ is for ‘Excellence’, ‘A’ is for ‘Aroha’, ‘R’ is for ‘Respect’ and ‘T’ is for ‘Togetherness’. This is a perfect match for the school to support the emergency services and the Road Accident Remembrance Day as we have a shared understanding as a school which is ‘Living and learning with HEART’. We try to do this each and every day of our lives and it’s so very rewarding when it all comes together like this, says Toni Burnside, Principal.

“For us it is really important the children have a not just local perspective, but also a national and global perspective. Through looking beyond their own community they realise they are part of something bigger and they understand the benefits of giving and develop an appreciation for this. We also have a number of students whose parents are Firefighters which means there is a natural and authentic connection for us,” says Jan Thompson, Year 4 – 6 teacher.

You are welcome to obtain further statements from Banks Avenue School.

Names from photographs are able to be supplied.

For further information or comments, please contact Sarah Dean on 027 324 0918 or roadtraffictrauma@xtra.co.nz or Jan Thompson, Banks Avenue School.

END

26 October 2018

MEDIA RELEASE

ROAD ACCIDENT REMEMBRANCE DAY 2018

The Road Traffic Accident Trauma Charitable Trust (‘Trust’) will host its third annual Road Accident Remembrance Day at 10-30am on Saturday 3 November 2018 at the Lake Front, North Hagley Park, Christchurch.

The Road Accident Remembrance Day is a public event that brings together the local community to acknowledge those who have been affected by road traffic related accidents. Attendees include members of the emergency services, those involved in post-accident care and accident recovery personnel.

It will be an opportunity to acknowledge road crash survivors many who may have had life changing experiences and to acknowledge those that have tragically lost their lives on the roads in the Christchurch and Canterbury Region from 1 September 2017 – 31 August 2018.

In conjunction with the Road Accident Remembrance Day the Trust will also announce recipients of the second annual Canterbury Road Trauma Awards. The three award categories are Canterbury Road Trauma Awards for Public Service, Community Service, and Trauma Prevention. Each community nominated recipient will be presented their Award by the Canterbury Road Trauma Awards Committee.

Sarah Dean, Founder of the Trust says “The annual Road Accident Remembrance Day is of course a public event, and a day for affected families, friends and colleagues to take pause to remember and reflect. We encourage everyone to attend to show their respect to the survivors, as well as remember those that have tragically lost their lives in road related accidents.

It is also a day in which we give thanks and acknowledge the emergency service personnel and health care professionals involved in post-accident care and recovery.  We will also announce the recipients of the 2018 Canterbury Road Trauma Awards and it will be our pleasure to announce and congratulate each recipient on the day.”

Said Inspector Ash Tabb, Road Policing Manager, Canterbury Police, “New Zealand Police’s purpose is to ensure every person who lives, works or transits through New Zealand is safe and feels safe – on the roads and in our communities.  We are committed to road safety, reducing crime and social harm, and building public trust and confidence.  It is ‘Our Business’ to make Aotearoa the safest country. It is important to recognise the tragic human cost to individuals, whanau and the community caused by deaths and serious injuries on our roads. This day lets us acknowledge those whom work to prevent crashes and reduce trauma on our roads when there are.”

Jim Harland, NZ Transport Director Regional Relationships Agency, says the Transport Agency is aiming to prevent crashes as well as reduce the seriousness of crashes. “We need to look at all the factors which contribute to serious crashes which have such a huge and long-term impact upon individuals, families and communities. The Road Accident Remembrance Day helps us remind people of the on-going repercussions of vehicle crashes and the need to reduce road risks in as many ways as we can,” he said.

David Sackhouse, Christchurch Metropolitan Area Commander, Fire and Emergency New Zealand says “Motor vehicle accidents impact not just on those involved and their families and friends, but also on emergency services personnel and the families they go home to. Last year Fire and Emergency attended 7,195, crashes, 906 of them in Canterbury. We urge everyone to stick to the speed limit, wear seat belts and make good decisions. Remember: life is a journey not a destination.”

Christine Prince, CEO, Canterbury West Coast Air Rescue Trust, acknowledges those in our community deeply impacted by road trauma and says “We provide our support to raise awareness of road trauma and the impacts within our community, as well as  recognising our fellow emergency services and those involved in post-accident care and recovery, in this significant day of Remembrance.”

Craig Downing, Christchurch Metropolitan Territory Manager for St John, said the organisation was supportive of Road Accident Remembrance Day as ambulance staff witnessed the devastation of road trauma first hand and the tragic effects it had on New Zealand communities. “The Road Accident Remembrance Day is a good opportunity for communities to reflect on the long-term impact of road crashes and work towards reducing serious injuries and fatalities on New Zealand roads,” he said.

Dan Coward, General Manager Older Persons Health, Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, Canterbury District Health Board said “As the country’s busiest trauma centre, staff across Burwood and Christchurch Hospital manage with the physical and emotional consequences of road traffic accidents on a daily basis.

Over half of all trauma injuries presenting to Christchurch Hospital are as a result of traffic accidents – whether involving people as drivers, passengers, motorcyclists, cyclists or pedestrians.

The Road Accident Remembrance Day is a chance to reflect on the lives impacted by road traffic crashes – the injured people themselves, their families, health care staff, first responders and our community”.

Following organisation representatives will be available to speak to the Media on the day at approximately 20 minutes after the ceremony:

Sarah Dean, Founder, Road Traffic Accident Trauma Charitable Trust

David Stackhouse, Christchurch Metropolitan Area Commander, Fire and Emergency

Inspector Ash Tabb, Road Policing Manager, Canterbury Police

Craig Downing, Metropolitan Area Manager, St John

Jim Harland, NZ Transport Agency, Director Regional Relationships

Christine Prince, Canterbury West Coast Air Rescue Trust

Dan Coward, Canterbury District Health Board

For further information or information on road trauma counselling services, please contact Sarah Dean on 027 324 0918 or roadtraffictrauma@xtra.co.nz.

END

25 October 2018

MEDIA RELEASE

EMBARGOED 12PM, SATURDAY, 3 NOVEMBER 2018

2018 CANTERBURY ROAD TRAUMA AWARDS RECIPIENTS

Now in its third year, the Road Traffic Accident Trauma Charitable Trust (‘Trust’) is hosting the annual Road Accident Remembrance Day on Saturday, 3rd November 2018 at 10-30am on the Lake Front, North Hagley Park, Christchurch.

In conjunction with this, the Trust will also announce the recipients of the 2018 Canterbury Road Trauma Awards. Each community nominated recipient will be presented their Award by the Canterbury Road Trauma Awards Committee.

Sarah Dean, Founder of the Trust says, “we created the Canterbury Road Trauma Awards to acknowledge not only those people whose skills, leadership and ability to work under extreme pressure and trying circumstances, have saved lives and minimised trauma, but also those who work tirelessly to prevent more tragedy on the roads, as well as ordinary members of the public who have found themselves at the scene of a road accident, and having to do extraordinary things to help. It will be our pleasure to announce, thank and congratulate each deserving Award recipient on the day”.

Canterbury Road Trauma Prevention Award Recipient

After 31 years of attending hundreds of serious and fatal crashes, Dan Harker decided that much more was needed to prevent crashes and save lives on New Zealand roads.

For Dan, the catalyst was an accident that happened in rural Canterbury back in 2014, where a motorist failed to see a stop sign and drove into another car, killing a mother, her 12-year-old daughter and her daughter’s 12-year-old friend.

“Something’s got to come from these tragedies, so I decided we needed to change the way we manage rural intersections and make our roads smarter and safer.”

His search found an emerging international trend in the use of vehicle-activated warning lights. With no off-the-shelf solution, Harker used his Kiwi ingenuity to produce them himself.

These roadside mounted lights detect an oncoming vehicle and flash orange to alert the driver that they are approaching a junction. Powered through solar technology the signs are energy efficient and cost effective.

Canterbury Road Trauma Award for Community Service Recipient

Dr Amy Irons was one of the first on the scene on what transpired to be a double fatality motor vehicle accident which involved two deceased English tourists colliding with a heavy motor vehicle at the intersection of Blakes Road and Shands Road, Christchurch on 15 February 2018.

“Dr Irons is a Doctor in emergency medicine and rendered first aid to the deceased. Dr Irons entered the deceased’s vehicle and attempted to maintain an open airway of the female by reaching through from the backseat into the front.

While her efforts were unsuccessful, Dr Irons was assertive and willing to assist in very traumatic times” says Sergeant Grant Stewart, Canterbury Police. “The Canterbury Police would like to warmly congratulate Amy for being the recipient of the Canterbury Road Trauma Award for Community Service for 2018. Her initial actions at the scene of a double fatality motor vehicle crash in February 2018 were brave and professional and Amy is a very worthy recipient and should be proud of her actions.”

“This nomination was unexpected, but I am grateful for the award. I believe that any person trained in health care would also contribute as best they could if they were in the same situation. I was appreciative of the help of an experienced police officer at the scene before other emergency services arrived. I cannot speak highly enough of the professionalism and care shown by police both at the scene and in the days afterwards. It takes a special type of person to be able to deal with these tragedies on a recurring basis; emergency services deserve our highest regard” says Amy Irons.

Canterbury Road Trauma Award for Public Service Recipient

After carrying out a significant amount of data collection as Canterbury District Health Board’s Trauma Nurse Coordinator, Mel Evans saw a greater need for a better coordination of care for the region’s trauma patients.

“Mel discovered that many patients were suffering from multiple problems and they were being looked after by several different specialist teams. She took the initiative and set up a system that got the different departments talking to each other more, which has resulted in more efficient care for our patients,” says Canterbury DHB Intensive Care Unit Specialist David Bowie.

Mel says she was pleasantly shocked to hear that she had been given an award for something she sees as part of her everyday role.

“I am very thankful that the work we are doing at Christchurch Hospital has been recognised, as it has led to our patients getting all of the treatment they require sooner and will help us continue to build a world class trauma service,” says Mel.

You are welcome to obtain further statements prior to the Road Accident Remembrance Day. Award recipients are not be published until 12pm on Saturday, 3 November 2018 after the Road Accident Remembrance Day ceremony.

For further information on the Canterbury Road Trauma Awards, please contact Sarah Dean on 027 324 0918 or roadtraffictrauma@xtra.co.nz.

END

20 July 2018

2018 Canterbury Road Trauma Award nominations open

Nominations are now open for the 2018 Canterbury Road Trauma Awards.

The Road Traffic Accident Trauma Charitable Trust (RTATCT) established the award last year as a way of recognising people from all walks of life who have made an influential difference to those affected by road trauma.

“The Canterbury Road Trauma Awards are for ordinary people doing exceptional work, day in, day out, across Canterbury and recognise those in the community who may otherwise not be acknowledged,” said Sarah Dean, Founder of the RTATCT.

Canterbury DHB Chief Executive David Meates said the people who helped those affected by road trauma deserved recognition.

“Christchurch has the busiest trauma centre in the country, receiving patients from all over the South Island and spinal trauma patients from the lower North Island,” he said.

“This is a complex, multi-disciplinary service, and many of the professionals working with road trauma are donating their non-clinical time to help people who may be experiencing the most challenging event of their life.

“We also need to consider everyone else involved with these events – members of the public who stop to help, emergency services, and non-clinical staff.”

The Canterbury Road Trauma Awards have three categories – the Canterbury Road Trauma Award for Public Service, Canterbury Award for Road Trauma Prevention and Canterbury Road Trauma Award for Community Service.

The New Zealand Transport Agency encourages companies in the transport and infrastructure sectors to think about ways they have installed systems or safety features into design in order to increase safety for road users, says Transport Agency Director Regional Relationships Jim Harland.

“Entering the Canterbury Road Trauma Awards is a way to acknowledge the work your teams are doing. These awards are a powerful way to raise awareness of road trauma and the long-term and ongoing aftermath of every serious or fatal road crash.”

Last year’s winners were Jack Lowery, Senior Sergeant Kelly Larsen and Katrina Martin.

St John’s Jack Lowery received the Award for Public Service after responding to a serious crash and triple fatality in Leeston on Boxing Day 2016.

“I was humbled to have been nominated for the Canterbury Road Trauma Award for Public Service,” Jack said.

“As the only medical personnel on scene initially Jack had to make complex and challenging decisions. His sound judgement and ability to remain calm while treating patients that had injuries requiring specialist care was remarkable,” said Craig Downing, Christchurch Metro Territory Manager at St John.

“St John is supportive of the Awards as ambulance staff witness the devastation of road trauma first hand and the tragic effects it had on New Zealand communities. The Road Accident Remembrance Day is a good opportunity for communities to reflect on the long-term impact of road crashes and work towards reducing fatalities on New Zealand roads.”

The Canterbury Road Trauma Prevention Award was granted to Senior Sergeant Kelly Larsen, Canterbury Police for her role as Officer in Charge, Road Policing Operations for Canterbury.

“Kelly demonstrated her commitment, ingenuity and vision to improve the safety of everyone on our roads by expanding the Forbidden Driver Compliance Scheme as well as developing and implementing Operation Graduate – an innovative response to driver licensing,” said Sarah Dean from RTATCT.

“I am fortunate to be in a role where I can influence the approach we are taking with road safety,” said Senior Sergeant Kelly Larsen, Manager Road Policing Operations, Canterbury.

“I work with a wonderful team of people who are equally committed to keeping our communities safe by preventing deaths and serious injury crashes on our roads, despite the challenging situations they find themselves in at times. Too many families are impacted by road trauma – this needs to change, with everyone having a role to play.

“This award also serves to acknowledge of the commitment and dedication of our partners and community volunteers, without whom we couldn’t achieve the results we do.”

Katrina Martin received the 2017 Canterbury Road Trauma Award for Community Service after assisting at a serious road traffic related crash in Leeston. Katrina stayed and aided each victim until the appropriate emergency services personnel were onsite.

“It is often witnesses that are the first responders to road crashes. Unfortunately, the majority of these people bear witness to significant trauma. Their contribution can make a substantial difference to the outcome of those affected,” said Sarah Dean from RTATCT.

“Despite some significant contributions the majority of these people do not qualify for the New Zealand Bravery Awards. This award also acknowledges those in our community who aid in the rehabilitation and care of a road traffic accident survivor.

“We encourage the general public to make a nomination for these unsung heroes as they are often left unrecognised and it is important we acknowledge their outstanding contribution to community service”,

Nominations for this year’s Canterbury Road Trauma Awards open on 23 July and close on 14 September 2018 and the winners will receive their awards at the RTATCT’s Road Accident Remembrance Day on Saturday, 3 November 2018 at 10.30am, in North Hagley Park, Christchurch.

The RTATCT intends to nationalise the Awards in alignment with its national expansion.

The Canterbury Road Trauma Awards Committee members who decide the award recipients are Sarah Dean; Councillor Aaron Keown (Christchurch City Council and Canterbury District Health Board); Prof. Gary Hooper (Head of the Orthopaedic Surgery and Musculoskeletal Medicine Department, University of Otago Christchurch); Dr Glen Koorey (Principal, Senior Traffic Engineer and Transport Planner, ViaStrada); Prof. Alan Nicholson (Civil and Natural Resources Engineering, University of Canterbury); Steve Wakefield (Steve Wakefield Services Limited and Canterbury District Health Board) and Jenny Dickinson (Lead Advisor Strategic Interventions, Safety and Environment, New Zealand Transport Agency).

ENDS

2017

27 October 2017

ROAD ACCIDENT REMEMBRANCE DAY 2017

The Road Traffic Accident Trauma Charitable Trust (‘Trust’) will host its second annual Road Accident Remembrance Day on Saturday, 4 November 2017 at 10.30am, at North Hagley Park, Christchurch.

The Road Accident Remembrance Day is a public event that provides an opportunity to bring together the local community to acknowledge those that have been affected by road traffic related accidents. Attendees include members of the emergency services, those involved in post-accident care and accident recovery personnel.  It will be an opportunity to acknowledge road crash survivors many who may have had life changing experiences and to acknowledge those that have tragically lost their lives on the roads in the Christchurch and Canterbury Region from 1 September 2016 – 31 August 2017.

In conjunction with this year’s Road Accident Remembrance Day the Trust has introduced the Canterbury Road Trauma Awards. The award categories are Canterbury Road Trauma Award for Public Service, Canterbury Road Trauma Award for Community Service, and Canterbury Road Trauma Prevention Award. Each community nominated recipient will be presented their Award by the Canterbury Road Trauma Awards Committee.

Sarah Dean, Founder of the Trust says “The inaugural Road Accident Remembrance Day was a great success and we look forward to hosting our second annual event. This year we are delighted to introduce the Canterbury Road Trauma Awards and it will be our pleasure to announce and congratulate each deserving Award recipient on the day.

This is a public event and we encourage the general public to attend to show their respect to the survivors, those that have tragically lost their lives in road related accidents and to acknowledge the emergency services personnel and those involved in the post-accident care and recovery, many of whom work tirelessly and often find themselves in challenges circumstances without recognition”.

Craig Downing, Christchurch Metropolitan Territory Manager for St John, said the organisation was supportive of Road Accident Remembrance Day as ambulance staff witnessed the devastation of road trauma first hand and the tragic effects it had on New Zealand communities. “The Road Accident Remembrance Day is a good opportunity for communities to reflect on the long-term impact of road crashes and work towards reducing fatalities on New Zealand roads,” he said.

David Stackhouse, Christchurch Metropolitan Area Commander, Fire and Emergency New Zealand says “‘Our crews see first-hand the impact a split-second decision can have on the lives of families and communities. Last year firefighters attended 6,215 motor vehicle crashes. Today we remember those who have survived, and those who have lost their lives in road crashes and the emergency responders who helped them. We call on people to please drive safely.”

Canterbury District Health Board says as the country’s busiest trauma centre, staff at Christchurch Hospital manage on a daily basis with the physical and emotional consequences of road traffic accidents.

Over half of all trauma injuries presenting to the city’s hospital are as a result of traffic accidents – be they involving drivers, passengers, motorcyclists, cyclists or pedestrians.

In the past year 2275 men, women and children were treated in the hospital’s emergency department with injuries sustained in motor vehicle accidents. Of those 9 died in hospital as a result of their injuries and a further 122 people suffered major trauma injuries. The average length of stay in hospital was 13 days, the longest – 60 days.

Canterbury District Health Board member, Aaron Keown says “the impact of those fatalities and injuries is felt far beyond our hospital system, deeply affecting families and communities.”

Aaron, who is also Deputy Chair of the Canterbury Road Trauma Awards Committee, sees Remembrance Day as “a way for families, friends and professionals involved in these tragic events to stop and reflect. My hope is that those not affected might also reflect, and hopefully avoid ever being in the same situation. “

Aaron Keown tragically lost his mother and his cousin in separate road crashes.

Canterbury DHB extends its sympathies to the families of road accident victims and acknowledges the many hundreds of individuals and families living with the life-long health impacts of road accidents.

New Zealand Transport Agency Director Regional Relationships Jim Harland says the need to prevent crashes and also reduce the seriousness of crashes when they occur is the main goal of the “Safe System” approach. “We need to look at all the factors which contribute to serious crashes which have such a huge and long-term impact upon individuals, families and communities. The Road Accident Remembrance Day is one way to remind people of the on-going repercussions of vehicle crashes and the need to reduce our risks in as many ways as we can.”

Rachael McNutt, General Manager of the Canterbury West Coast Air Rescue Trust says Staff, Trustees and Crew of the Canterbury West Coast Air Rescue Trust extend our sympathies to the families, friends and loved ones of those who have tragically passed away on Canterbury’s roads this past year. “We thank the Road Traffic Accident Trauma Charitable Trust for the opportunity to be involved in this occasion; to remember those who have passed, to acknowledge those who have survived, and to recognise all those who, through their role in emergency services and post-accident care and recovery teams, provide specialist care and support to people in their time of need. Congratulations to the well-deserved recipients of this year’s Canterbury Road Trauma Awards” she said.

The Westpac Rescue Helicopter crew will be on standby 24/7 this summer, watching over the lives of all Cantabrians. We wish everyone a very happy and safe holiday period – and please, take care on the roads.

For further information or information on road trauma counselling services, please contact Sarah Dean on 027 324 0918 or roadtraffictrauma@xtra.co.nz.

END

20 October 2017

2017 CANTERBURY ROAD TRAUMA AWARDS RECIPIENT

The Road Traffic Accident Trauma Charitable Trust (‘Trust’) will be hosting its second annual Road Accident Remembrance Day on Saturday, 4 November 2017 at 10.30am, in North Hagley Park, Christchurch.

In conjunction with this year’s Road Accident Remembrance Day the Trust has introduced the Canterbury Road Trauma Awards which is administered by the Canterbury Road Trauma Awards Committee (‘Committee). The award categories are Canterbury Road Trauma Award for Public Service, Canterbury Road Trauma Award for Community Service, and Canterbury Road Trauma Prevention Award. Each community nominated recipient will be presented their Award by the Committee.

Sarah Dean, Founder of the Trust says, “we are delighted to introduce the Canterbury Road Trauma Awards and it will be our pleasure to announce and congratulate each deserving Award recipient on the day”.

Canterbury Road Trauma Award for Community Service

Recipient: Jack Lowery, Station Manager, St John

Jack Lowery was the most deserved recipient of the Canterbury Road Trauma Award for Public Service.  The Award was granted by the Committee on his merits that as a sole Ambulance Officer in the infancy of his career.

Jack demonstrated commitment of dedication to care to each victim involved in the crash and despite the triple fatalities he maintained perseverance in the face of adversity. Jack responded to a triple fatality of young people from on 26 December 2016 in Leeson. He attended the crash as a single crew member and knew one of the victims. Jack is only 21 years of age.  The call was to a car accident on the Harts Road/Southbridge Edgemere Road at about 2:31am. The sole officer was Jack Lowery. Jack arrived at 2:36am and the next unit was 2:53.

Jack had a considerable length of time on scene having to make complex and challenging decisions. Jack was the only medical person on scene for a long time. His decision making and ability to remain calm while treating patients that had injuries requiring specialist care was remarkable.

St John is delighted to have Station Manager, Jack Lowery recognised for his outstanding contribution to a serious motor vehicle accident on 26 December 2016. Putting aside his own emotions, Jack demonstrated leadership, compassion, empathy and direction to those that were so badly affected by this tragedy.

St John is extremely proud of all its staff that attend to over 500,000 emergency calls a year. The majority of staff do so as volunteers in their communities 365 days a year.” Says Craig Downing,

Christchurch Metro Territory Manager, St John.

Canterbury Road Trauma Prevention Award

Recipient: Senior Sergeant Kelly Larsen, Canterbury Police

Senior Sergeant Kelly Larsen was the most deserved recipient of the Canterbury Road Trauma Prevention Award. Kelly was granted this Award by the Committee on her merits in her role as Officer in Charge, Operations in Road Policing. Kelly has shown her commitment and dedication of care to her role by identifying and implementing two progressive programmes ‘Forbidden Driver Compliance Scheme’ and ‘Operation Graduate’.

Nearly 1000 drivers are caught ‘Driving While Forbidden’ in Canterbury per year. The aim was to prevent offending and get these drivers licensed. As a direct result of the Forbidden Driver Compliance Scheme running, 42% of drivers obtained their licence with no further action required by Police, enabling them to drive safely and legally. Additional benefits includes reduced Justice Sector demand, reduced financial stress on families, increased employment opportunities and reduced offending.

Canterbury has a high rate of graduated driver licence breaches. Operation Graduate was developed and driven to assist people gain their drivers licence, or transition from their Learner Licence to their Restricted Licence. It provides support, assistance and training to assist these drivers up to their next class of licence.

Kelly isn’t just happy to accept an enforcement interaction on the side of the road, dealing with the offence the driver has committed. Kelly wants that interaction to have a meaningful outcome; an outcome that assists the driver develop into a safer road user, and thereby increasing the safety of all road users in Canterbury.

Canterbury Road Trauma Award for Community Service

Recipient: Katrina Martin

Katrina Martin was the most deserved recipient of the Canterbury Road Trauma Award for Community Service. The Award was granted to Katrina where she assisted at the road traffic related crash on 26 December 2016 in Leeston. Katrina demonstrated commitment of dedication to care to each victim involved in the crash and despite the triple fatalities she stayed and aided each victim until the appropriate emergency services personnel was onsite.

Katrina feels her actions would not separate her from any other person who would come across a similar tragedy. She believes emergency services and medical personnel deserve the highest recognition. “Many emergency services personnel unwittingly put themselves out there day in and day out, many of whom will be acting in their role in a voluntary capacity. It takes a special type of person to be able to do this.”

Katrina is grateful to be nominated for the Award and acknowledges the sudden loss for the five families involved. Katrina admits at times she finds it particularly difficult knowing she is able to come home to her children.

You are welcome to obtain further statements prior to the Road Accident Remembrance Day. Award recipients are not be published until 12pm on Saturday, 4 November 2017 after the Road Accident Remembrance Day ceremony.

For further information on the Canterbury Road Trauma Awards, please contact Sarah Dean on 027 324 0918 or roadtraffictrauma@xtra.co.nz.

END

19 July 2017

CANTERBURY ROAD TRAUMA AWARDS

The Road Traffic Accident (‘RTA’) Trauma Charitable Trust is launching the Canterbury Road Trauma Awards. The Awards will be become a National initiative in conjunction with the Trust’s expansion.

There are three categories, Canterbury Road Trauma Award for Public Service, Canterbury Award for Road Trauma Prevention and Canterbury Road Trauma Award for Community Service.

CANTERBURY ROAD TRAUMA AWARD FOR PUBLIC SERVICE

This annual award recognises outstanding individuals, teams or organisations deserving of special recognition for their outstanding public service by their contribution or commitment to a duty of care for those affected by road trauma.

This award is open to first responders and industry professionals from non-profit organisations, private and public organisations that are involved in road trauma care and recovery.

CANTERBURY AWARD FOR ROAD TRAUMA PREVENTION

This annual award recognises outstanding individuals, teams or professional organisations deserving of special recognition for their contribution to road safety, public education, road trauma prevention initiatives, and a professional duty of care in Canterbury. This may include initiatives across all modes of land transport and may include engineering and technology, network optimisation, and demand management.

This award is open to industry professionals from non-profit organisations, private and public organisations that are involved in preventing the likelihood or severity of road trauma incidents.

CANTERBURY ROAD TRAUMA AWARD FOR COMMUNITY SERVICE

This annual award recognises members of the community who have provided outstanding care or support to a road trauma victim by making an influential difference to their treatment, recovery or rehabilitation.

This award is open to members of the general public who do not meet the criteria for the Public Service Award.

The Award recipients will be announced at the Road Accident Remembrance Day held in North Hagley Park on Saturday, 4 November 2017.

Sarah Dean, Founder of the RTA Trauma Charitable Trust says “The Awards are industry specific and is an opportunity to recognise those in the community that would otherwise not be acknowledged”.

“When drivers use our roads without care for others the consequences can be tragic and horrific – momentary inattention or a poor decision can result in families being irreparably harmed as a result of death or serious injury.

Collaborative efforts between Police and our community partners are critical to increasing awareness and promoting safer driver behaviour.  Police are pleased to support the RTA Trauma Chartiable Trust’s Awards, which recognise that road safety is everyone’s responsibility”, says Kelly Larsen, Senior Sergeant of Canterbury Road Policing, New Zealand Police.

“Recognising the enormous cost road trauma has on the staff that do everything possible to save lives is possible through such Awards” says Craig Downing, Territory Manager, Christchurch Metropolitan, Order of St John.

For further information please contact Sarah Dean on 027 324 0918 or roadtraffictrauma@xtra.co.nz.

END

2016

Police support remembrance day for road crash victims, emergency services and those involved in the post accident care and recovery.

Canterbury Police will be a partner at this weekend’s Road Accident Remembrance Day in Christchurch (22 October 2016).

The event, organised by the Road Traffic Accident Trauma Charitable Trust, is being held at North Hagley Park at 10am on Saturday. “Through my work with the Trust I noted as a society we are all affected by the impact of road crashes. I knew more needed to be done to acknowledge the survivors, those that tragically lost their lives and thank those involved in the emergency response, post care and recovery” says Sarah Dean, Founder, Road Traffic Accident Trauma Charitable Trust

Sarah’s initiative progressed very quickly with positive responses received from the Police, emergency services and those within the medical field. Sarah says “although for many attending to the care of those involved in road traffic accidents is deemed as “part of their role” – the impact this has on them personally should be recognised”.

“Road safety is everyone’s responsibility, so we are pleased this day is happening as it will help to highlight the harm road crashes cause the community,” says Canterbury District Acting Road Policing Manager, Kelly Larsen.

“This commemorative event allows us to remember those who have died on our roads. It is also a time when we can pause and reflect on the decisions we all make when we use the roads.

“As far as Police is concerned, any death or injury is one too many. We will continue to do everything we can to ensure the message gets to those who need to hear it – if only to prevent another crash from occurring.

“It would be great to see people there on Saturday. The event will help to encourage social and corporate responsibility and to emphasise the role businesses and communities play in reducing harm on the roads,” says Ms Larsen.

Canterbury Police District Commander John Price will be present on the day and will make a speech on road safety. He will be joining other speakers from the New Zealand Fire Service, the New Zealand Transport Agency and other sectors.

ENDS

Police Media Centre