Canterbury Road Trauma Award for Public Service


AWARD FOR PUBLIC SERVICE 2019 RECIPIENT: DR MARTIN SAGE, FORENSIC PATHOLOGIST

Dr Martin Sage, Forensic Pathologist of the Canterbury District Health Board is responsible for performing post-mortem investigations and reporting on traffic fatalities.

This involves reviewing the relationship between fatal traffic accidents and forensic medicine and helps form a better understanding of New Zealand’s road toll; with a long term focus on harm reduction through community awareness.

Over his years working in this capacity, Martin has personally worked on over 2,000 cases of road traffic cases and has been exposed to extensive road traffic trauma. Martin’s high level of respect for each case, and determination to find answers for families is vitally important to road traffic accidents in New Zealand. Findings and reports on road traffic accidents in

Canterbury contribute significantly to the coroner’s office making recommendations that can directly influence New Zealand’s driving behaviours.

AWARD FOR PUBLIC SERVICE 2018 RECIPIENT: MEL EVANS, TRAUMA NURSE CO-ORDINATOR, CANTERBURY DISTRICT

After carrying out a significant amount of data collection as Canterbury District Health Board’s Trauma Nurse Coordinator, Mel Evans saw a greater need for a better coordination of care for the region’s trauma patients.

“Mel discovered that many patients were suffering from multiple problems and they were being looked after by several different specialist teams. She took the initiative and set up a system that got the different departments talking to each other more, which has resulted in more efficient care for our patients,” says Canterbury DHB Intensive Care Unit Specialist David Bowie.

Mel says she was pleasantly shocked to hear that she had been given an award for something she sees as part of her everyday role.

“I am very thankful that the work we are doing at Christchurch Hospital has been recognised, as it has led to our patients getting all of the treatment they require sooner and will help us continue to build a world class trauma service,” says Mel.

AWARD FOR PUBLIC SERVICE 2017 RECIPIENT: JACK LOWERY, AMBULANCE OFFICER, ST JOHN

On 26 December, 2016, Jack Lowery responded to a triple fatality accident in Leeston. In the infancy of his career and as the sole medical personnel on scene for approximately 20 minutes, Jack had to make complex and challenging decisions. His sound judgement and ability to remain calm while treating patients that had injuries requiring specialist care was remarkable. Jack demonstrated leadership, compassion, empathy and direction to those that were so badly affected by this tragedy.


Canterbury Road Trauma Prevention Award

PREVENTION AWARD 2019 RECIPIENT: DR BRYAN PIDWERBESKY, TECHNICAL DIRECTOR, FULTON HOGAN

Dr Bryan Pidwerbesky, Technical Director of Fulton Hogan has spent more than 30 years helping highway authorities, industry associations and roading contractors, to increase the smoothness and skid resistance of roads, to reduce the frequency and severity of crashes and the associated trauma. He has developed a course on skid resistance that has been delivered to roading engineers around the country for 15 years. He was also heavily involved in advancing the use of high friction surfacing at locations with high crash rates and high friction demand.

 

PREVENTION AWARD 2019 RECIPIENT: SENIOR CONSTABLE BRENT COSGROVE, NEW ZEALAND POLICE

Brent has served with the Police for 27 years and has been involved in road policing for approximately 12 years, with 10 years working in the Impairment Prevention Team. Brent has been instrumental in the success of the road safety programme ‘Crash Bash’, which is a stage performance that tours secondary schools in Canterbury, and which is aimed at preventing road trauma through changing driver behaviour. Brent has played a significant role in the development of content and material for the script. He has effectively communicated key and factual information on young driver road safety risk in an engaging and relatable manner that students relate to and respect.

Unfortunately Senior Constable Cosgrove was unable to attend the Canterbury Road Trauma Awards ceremony, however, Inspector Ash Tabb, Head of Roading, Canterbury Police kindly accepted the Award on his
behalf.

PREVENTION AWARD 2018 RECIPIENT: DAN HARKER, DIRECTOR

After 31 years of attending hundreds of serious and fatal crashes, Dan Harker decided that much more was needed to prevent crashes and save lives on New Zealand roads.

For Dan, the catalyst was an accident that happened in rural Canterbury back in 2014, where a motorist failed to see a stop sign and drove into another car, killing a mother, her 12-year-old daughter and her daughter’s 12-year-old friend.

“Something’s got to come from these tragedies, so I decided we needed to change the way we manage rural intersections and make our roads smarter and safer.”

His search found an emerging international trend in the use of vehicle-activated warning lights. With no off-the-shelf solution, Harker used his Kiwi ingenuity to produce them himself.

These roadside mounted lights detect an oncoming vehicle and flash orange to alert the driver that they are approaching a junction. Powered through solar technology the signs are energy efficient and cost effective.

PREVENTION AWARD 2017 RECIPIENT: SENIOR SERGEANT KELLY LARSEN, NEW ZEALAND POLICE

Senior Sergeant Kelly Larsen of New Zealand Police was granted this Award by her merits in her role as Officer in Charge, Road Policing Operations for Canterbury.  Kelly has shown her commitment and dedication to improving the safety of those on our roads in the Canterbury Region by expanding the ˜Forbidden Driver Compliance Scheme’ as well as developing and implementing ˜Operation Graduate’ – an innovative response to driver licensing.

Kelly is passionate about ensuring Police interactions with drivers have a meaningful outcome; an outcome which improves driver decision making and behavior, thereby increasing the safety of all road users.


Canterbury Road Trauma Award for Community Service

AWARD FOR COMMUNITY SERVICE  2019 AWARD RECIPIENTS: WAIAU VOLUNTARY FIRE BRIGADE, FIRE AND EMERGENCY NEW ZEALAND

On 27 November 2018 eleven crew of the Waiau Voluntary Fire Brigade were dispatched as the first response to a serious road crash involving a motor vehicle accident on the rural inland road between Waiau and Kaikoura. On arrival the scene
presented with several challenges including a truck on its side with driver trapped and injured, chemicals present and road management required on a state highway.

This award was made to the Waiau Voluntary Fire Brigade for their exemplary skills and commitment they had demonstrated while caring as first-response service for their community. First responders have a key role in increasing the likelihood that people recover from road trauma.

AWARD FOR COMMUNITY SERVICE  2018 AWARD RECIPIENT: DR AMY IRONS

Dr Amy Irons was one of the first on the scene on what transpired to be a double fatality motor vehicle accident which involved two deceased English tourists colliding with a heavy motor vehicle at the intersection of Blakes Road and Shands Road, Christchurch on 15 February 2018.

“Dr Irons is a Doctor in emergency medicine and rendered first aid to the deceased. Dr Irons entered the deceased’s vehicle and attempted to maintain an open airway of the female by reaching through from the backseat into the front.

While her efforts were unsuccessful, Dr Irons was assertive and willing to assist in very traumatic times” says Sergeant Grant Stewart, Canterbury Police. “The Canterbury Police would like to warmly congratulate Amy for being the recipient of the Canterbury Road Trauma Award for Community Service for 2018. Her initial actions at the scene of a double fatality motor vehicle crash in February 2018 were brave and professional and Amy is a very worthy recipient and should be proud of her actions.”

“This nomination was unexpected, but I am grateful for the award. I believe that any person trained in health care would also contribute as best they could if they were in the same situation. I was appreciative of the help of an experienced police officer at the scene before other emergency services arrived. I cannot speak highly enough of the professionalism and care shown by police both at the scene and in the days afterwards. It takes a special type of person to be able to deal with these tragedies on a recurring basis; emergency services deserve our highest regard” says Amy Irons.

AWARD FOR COMMUNITY SERVICE  2017 AWARD RECIPIENT: KATRINA MARTIN

On 26 December 2016 Katrina Martin was the first on the scene at the serious crash in Leeston. Katrina demonstrated commitment of dedication to care to each person involved. Despite the triple fatalities she attended to the two survivors, ensuring they remained conscious and that no further injuries were sustained until the appropriate emergency services personnel arrived.